Costa Lab, ecology, physiology, and conservation of marine animals
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PEOPLE

Dan Costa and friend
Daniel P. Costa, Ph.D.
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
costa@biology.ucsc.edu

• B.A., University of California, Los Angeles
• Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz
• Postdoctoral, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Focus: The adaptations of marine mammals and seabirds to life in the marine environment, especially the movements, foraging ecology and energetics of pinnipeds and seabirds.


Greg Breed, Ph.D.
Links between movement, survival, diving, and interannual variation and applying State-Space methods for assessing elephant seal movements with respect to sea surface temperature.
 
Patrick Robinson, Ph.D.

Navigation and search behaviors of the northern elephant seal, specifically the reliable cues used by these animals to accurately navigate thousands of kilometers of open ocean habitat.

Glen Worstell

Data Manager and Application Developer for Marine Mammals and Birds, Tagging of Pacific Predators. Data systems architecture and programming, research support, visualization, and analytical software applications design.

Stella Villegas
Stella Villegas, Ph.D.

Diving physiology and behavior in relation to water temperature of California and Galapagos sea lions.

Sara Maxwell

Sara Maxwell
How highly migratory species of conservation concern use seamounts as part of their migratory pathways.

 



Cory Champagne
Cory Champagne

I'm particularly fascinated with physiological processes operating at an animal's limits- animals that "push the envelope". My current research explores the limits of fasting physiology in elephant seals.

Melinda Fowler
Melinda Fowler

Pinniped physiological ecology and adaptations that allow an animal to inhabit its particular ecological niche, particularly lactation physiology and the environmental factors that impact provisioning of young.

Kimberly Goetz

Kimberly Goetz
Predictive habitat modeling in relation to conservation management.  I am currently investigating the winter foraging behavior and habitat utilization of Weddell seals in the Ross Sea.

Jason Hassrick
Jason Hassrick

Development of diving behavior in northern elephant seals, particularly how age and diving behavior are related to feeding success in females, and how oxygen stores relate to different diving behaviors
Justine Jackson-Ricketts

Justine Jackson-Ricketts
Trophic interactions,
food web dynamics, the role of top predators in ecosystems, and
how research in these fields can inform conservation efforts.

Sarah Hardee Peterson
Sarah Hardee Peterson
The ecology of northern elephant seals, including how seals may accumulate contaminants during foraging trips,
their impact on prey populations, and how their foraging locations and movements align with other upper-trophic level marine species in the north Pacific.
Melinda Conners
Melinda Conners

Behavioral ecology, the ability of species to adapt to changing and dynamic environments, and the mechanisms seabirds use to navigate the "featureless" surface of the oceans to find patchily distributed food.
Chandra Goetsch

Chandra Goetsch
How changing climate is influencing the distribution and migration patterns, trophic interactions, and foraging ecology of high trophic-level marine mammals, particularly pinnipeds.

Autumn-Lynn Harrison
Autumn-Lynn Harrison
Conservation biology and biodiversity research and linking conservation science with management. My current focus is to utilize tagging data to identify multispecies oceanic hotspots for wide-ranging animals in the Pacific.

Luis Huckstadt

Luis Huckstadt
Trophic and spatial ecology of pinnipeds.

 

 

 

Rachael Orben
Rachael Orben

Ecology of marine birds, specifically how the non-breeding season influences the summer breeding season and survivorship.

Nicole Teutschel
Nicole Teutschel
Trophic ecology of naive elephant seals. I hope to develop these skills to focus on conservation science and management of marine migratory megafauna combining physiological and spacial indicators to assess open ocean trophic ecology and predator dynamics.


The Costa lineage includes over thirty former students. Click here to see the full list.